Young Endurance Athletes Shown to be at Increased Risk for Early-Onset Skin Cancer

SKIN: The Journal of Cutaneous Medicine(TM), Early-onset basal cell carcinoma in young female endurance athletes: A report of three cases

Misconceptions regarding the extent of ultraviolet radiation exposure during cloud-covered days or early mornings and inadequate use of sunscreen or sun-protective clothing may be contributing factors”

— Jonathan J. Lee, MD

NEW YORK, NY, UNITED STATES, September 5, 2017 /EINPresswire.com/ — Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) of the skin is the most prevalent cancer in the United States. Although BCC less commonly metastasizes when compared to other forms of skin cancer, local invasion can lead to significant morbidity, particularly if there is a delay in diagnosis.

Although traditionally thought to be a disease of the elderly, a new article published today in SKIN: The Journal of Cutaneous Medicine(TM) highlights a previously overlooked at-risk population—young endurance athletes.

Jonathan Lee, M.D. and coauthors at the University of Pittsburgh report three cases of BCC in female triathletes and ultra-marathoners between the ages of 29 and 34. The authors hypothesize that the intense, intermittent exposure to ultraviolet radiation during long training periods puts endurance athletes at increased risk of developing early-onset BCC and other skin cancers.

“Misconceptions regarding the extent of ultraviolet radiation exposure during cloud-covered days or early mornings and inadequate use of sunscreen or sun-protective clothing may be contributing factors,” report Lee and colleagues, who advocate for close dermatologic follow-up and potentially for targeted screening efforts in this high-risk population.

SKIN: The Journal of Cutaneous Medicine(TM) is a peer-reviewed online medical journal that is the official journal of The National Society for Cutaneous Medicine. The mission of SKIN is to provide an enhanced and accelerated route to disseminate new dermatologic knowledge for all aspects of cutaneous disease.

For more details please visit www.jofskin.org or contact jofskin@gmail.com.

Editors’ Note: Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

Link to article

(DOI: 10.25251/skin.1.2.9)

Jonathan J. Lee, M.D.
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Dermatology
925-202-7539
email us here


Source: EIN Presswire